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finishing up my new book and this particular chapter is about sex. apparently mississippi is the dumbest state. that would concur in the sex chapter because they have the most std's in america. >> mississippi is burning. >> wow. >> bill, ninety 8% of the people sur -- 98% of the people surveyed say the worst state is whatever one you happen to be in at the time. thought? >> i don't like the theme of the show. this study proved the united states of america is like one big new york apartment. we don't know anything about our neighbors and everything we know is completely wrong. i brought this back to new york because we are rude and era gapt. arrogant. >> new york won best sports fans. you can make a case or not. but it also won worst sports fans. the last time i checked boston is not in new york. >> you just proved your point. >> coming up, what is it like to be owned more than anybody else on twitter. first, what is up with the obama's new dog? something impeachable i'm sure. pbjócqkb+ámñt>zyû >> sunny is a portuguese water dog. clearly we must discuss this important news in the -- >
on to help a student at howard and quote came out for students to go to mississippi because of the work that was going on there. i had seen some -- i had attended a deposition in washington and folk from mississippi and things they had suffered. this elderly man, hartman, talked about what happened on the bus. i was a student. all of the students were coming from all over the country. i was the black student and the student leadership at howard said we have to get there and be there with others. so i went to mississippi that summer of 1964 and i lived with a family. ms.johnson, her daughter was a teenager, june johnson and had been beaten in wynonna, mississippi. june was a strong girl. the family was strong there were about 12 children in the family. they took in three of us. two white girls and myself. host: ruth thanks for the call and thank you for sharing your story from 50 years ago. owen ullmann, we talked about your own participation. walk us through how you arrived here and why you came? guest: my parent has raised me and i'm proud of their values of stressing the importance
rather have a brand new state of the art pipeline traveling down the margin mississippi and on the trunk to be cut tanker cars and trucks. >> host: there was a story that was reported by the newspaper saying that the decision would likely be until the inspector general looked at the investigation of the conflict of interest complete and the inspector general looked at the complete of the environmental research mismanagement that prepares the environmental impact statement on the keystone xl on the central conflict. >> guest: it's not a new story. that came out and was thoroughly investigated. my understanding is that there were no conflicts found. what you are starting to see frankly is the recycling of a lot of defense. keep in mind, that executive order that was put in place that governs this entire process was put in place to expedite the cross border transportation facilities. instead of expediting it, this environment environmental impact we could have built the empire state building five times buy now. we have completed world war ii in less time. so again as an institutional list a
for the head start association. our office is located is -- our office is located in jackson, mississippi. i've been with head start since 1980 and am excited to be here today to share some of our concerns about sequestration. >> martha coven, associate director for education and community and labor at the office of management and budget which is part of the executive office of the president. so we on behalf of the present over to the budget for the number of federal agencies including education. the ministry for children and families at hhs where the head start progress. >> i'm the director of policy and planning at the office of head start within the department of health and human services and the start of the early childhood career 20 years ago in head start agency in brooklyn. so i'm really happy to be here today. >> i'm sharon parrott from the center on budget and policy priorities were on the vice president's budget policy and economic opportunity. this is the second go-round for me at the center on budget and just prior to returning in november i worked for secretaries and police at t
to go south of richmond. just the way i was cultivated and mississippi was a scary place because emmitt till was murdered there. and i still remember ibm blacked and when we go together i wonder what people think and all day ever say is come back. i remember you from your service and never sure president. but i was a little gun shy with how i was brought up but we had a wonderful time. >> calling on the republican line. >> caller: with a race race, every time a black person kills a white person and it is o.k. but if a white person kills a black person they set out it is a race. it is not race all the time. we are past all that we need to except people who they are and quit complaining. >> guest: who is complaining? >> caller: the blacks always complain. >> guest: whitey think we're always explaining our circumstances? >> caller: they just complain get over the past. >> guest: you are from the south. you're from the south to the seveners get over the loss of the confederate war of the state's? >> caller: i am past that. the south lost. >> host: can you give us a little bit of your histor
meaningful progress, we will march through virginia, through mississippi and several other places. do your remember? >> i remember all that. i was donated to the march on washington committee and my task was distributing john's speech, the original speech to member of the press who were seated down below lincoln, still above on the steps. i passed out these copies of john's speech and pointed out to them, that john would be the only speaker speaking that day who talked about black people instead of negroes or colored people as was the fashion. i thought and we thought that this demonstrated how militant we were and how different we were and better and superior we were from the other civil rights organizations. none of the reporters made any objection. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? >> i meant aggressive. nothing harmful or violent. i have always been upset by people who say, they are so militant. they equate it with violence. it is not necessarily equatable with violence. it just means somebody is it aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. we thought we were more militant than
are graduates from syracuse which are fifth and shepherd smith went to you have the of mississippi which was 14th and hemmer went to university of ohio which was 16th. do you know what this means? >> no. >> todd kelly is stocking all of them. >> true. that is an interesting and completely pointless list. >> greg, your senior year was a blur, right? >> my four years was a blur. >> what senior year? >> i actually cleaned up. my first two years were nothing but drinking and bad grades. and then i realized if i wanted a job i had to become -- i cleaned it up. boy that was a boring story. i expected something funny to come out of my mouth and instead it was just a little spit. coming up, ralph maccio is dead -- set against making a karate 4. he probably can't lift his leg past this point. i kid. what is this? a 15-ton ball of fat? i think i have died and gone to 15 ton ball of fat heaven. >>> was it a proper greeting for a player's cheating? on monday alex rodriguez made his season debut shortly after mlb suspended him for using performance enhancing drugs. and he wasn't met with cheers as i had pre
the gulf coast and florida panhandle all the way into south carolina. gulfport, mississippi, the floodwaters receding there but with more rain in the forecast they may rise yet again. tracking it all for us is chad myers. ha is the latest, chad? >> anderson, when you have a stationary front, like a stationary bike, things don't move. you can pedal that bike all you want, it is not going anywhere. these storms aren't going anywhere. so what is raining now was raining an hour ago and what was raining this weekend is pretty much still raining at this point. look at these five-day rainfall totals. this is from friday afternoon to now. 12.5 inches in florida thachlt is a beach. not much of a beach vacation. panama city, popular place, ten inches of rainfall over the weekend. everywhere that you see red, that's six inches. at purple higher than that, and the ten-inch bulls eyes, macon, georgia, has 24 more inches on ground than they should have. so when it rains, it floods. there's no place for the water to soak in. it's been like that for days and days and days and the rain conti
. the kids wish network has faced fines before in utah and mississippi. the fines, all those fines added up to a little more than $6,000. >> unbelievable. how that woman sleeps at night and she's there shaking her hand and acting like everything is proper. this kid's wish network, they have been around a long, long time. >> since 1997, and listen to this, this is interesting. it began with a different name. the fulfill the wish foundation, which sounds a lot like make a wish, right, anderson? >> yeah. >> the folks at make a wish actually sued forcing fulfill a wish to change the name. that's how they got to the kids wish network. we found that as quite common, too. the less than forthcoming charities they want names that sound very much like respected charities. >> the bottom line, there are good charities out there. people can go to charity navigator to find out actual ratings of charities. >> you really should. the last thing you should do is have the phone ring and find a tell marketer and telling you what they will do with the money. you should hang up the phone. >> that's how they rais
hill of mississippi. you know that portion of the speech, right? at the 50-year anniversary of that moment at 3:00 p.m. tomorrow, bells are going to ring in d.c. and across the country and even apparently in places as far away as switzerland and japan. that's tomorrow afternoon. here's the other thing you need to know for tomorrow, though. even if you're not in a place where you can watch tv during the day, take a note of this for tomorrow night. this is something that never happens. tomorrow night, wednesday night at 8:00 p.m. eastern, msnbc has moved heaven and earth to get permission to air the "i have a dream" speech uninterrupted in its entirety. you think you have heard the whole speech, but you really probably haven't. access to the tape of the speech is very, very highly restricted. it is almost impossible to get permission to play even any large piece of it, let alone the whole thing. but tomorrow here on msnbc, at 8:00 p.m., we have moved heaven and earth to be able to play "i have a dream" uninterrupted in full. you should plan to not miss it. this is not somethin
rights movement. on june 12th mississippi's naacp field secretary medgar evers was murdered outside his home. dr. king delivered his famous i have a dream speech and on july 2nd, 1964, about the johnson signed the civil rights act of 1964, the most sweeping civil rights legislation since reconstruction. both dr. king and his father led the congregation at ebeneezer baptist church. the current pastor of that church reverend dr. rafael joins me. >> good to be with you tony. thanks so much. >> give us your reflections of this day and move on from there. >> it's been an exciting day and a thrilling week, as we gathered on the mall remembering that great day 50 years ago, i'm a part of the post-civil rights generation, born a decade after dr. king's death. but for americans across the nation dr. king's words that day with his soaring oratory, our right to remember it but our challenge today is to make sure that while we engage in commemoration we move from commemoration to recommitment that we ensure that we do not cash in the dream for sentimental memories, dr. king came to the capital with
today? -- is a catfish legend in mississippi. >> we can do 400,000. >> 400,000 in one day. >> yes. >> a lot of fish. >> a lot of fish. >> reporter: one of the biggest catfish processors in the country. one of the driving forces for getting the u.s. department of agriculture to get it here. critics call that a huge waste of millions of your tax dollars because there is one big problem. you have fda inspecting? >> that's not correct. we have fda all right, a nonexistent inspection. >> reporter: believe it or not, two federal agencies are supposed to inspect the same fish. the usda spent $20 million for planning the inspections. while there have been concerns about the adequacy of inspections of imported fish in the past, do we really need usda inspection too? >> there are food safety concerns. >> catfish is a cat fish is a catfish. a safe food. >> reporter: one of the foremost food safety experts, former fda and usda official who says catfish is not a high risk food and fda should continue to be in charge of inspecting it. >> certainly isn't public health. the only thing you are lef
, mississippi, at "the advocate," a historically african-american newspaper. but "the advocate" had a history of being firebombed, a fact that worried his mother, so that did not last long. mr. jealous was also the executive director of the national newspapers publishers association, which represents african american focused, owned, and operated newspapers. what may have been his biggest advocacy challenge is how he courted his wife and the struggle to keep her and win her over with little money and a new job in d.c. he succeeded, however, and is married to lia, and the couple have two young children. but at the core of what mr. jealous is speaking about today, yesterday marked the 50th anniversary of the 1963 march on washington. five decades since martin luther king spoke, the nation has its first black president, but still has serious issues for the african-american people, including record incarceration, double digit unemployment, ballot box suppression, and youth violence. the killing of trayvon martin brought back racial concerns to the front pages. questions remain if the naacp, like m
was assassinated in his own driveway in mississippi. we were a very different country. the original march on washington for jobs and freedom which took place august 28, 1963 was a call to action, not just to citizens of all colors who were concerned about civil rights but to politicians. in fact, the original march was mainly directed at little leaders in congress and in the white house to follow through on president kennedy's push for a civil rights bill which passed the following year. 50 years later, the supreme court's conservative majority including its lone black member have gutted the voting rights act passed two years after the march in 1965. states are rolling back access to health care for women and the working class. it's under constant attack. we are a different country but still have a fight 0 our hands. so when you watch the coverage commemorating the march remember the call to action is political because it always has been. thanks so much for watching. "hardball" with chris matthews is next. >>> hillary's ahead of schedule but who is driving the bus? let's play "hardball."
but a few structures of the mississippi river valley and the reoccupied western tennessee. in the east ready lee led his ragtag confederate forces, the army of northern virginia to one victory after another of their opposite number. but the victories were all one on virginia soil. and in feeble, the virginia economy even as they defend it. he knew better than any southerner that the confederacy's resources or to limited to keep fending off the confederacy's enemies in definitely. only by carrying the war into the union states and only by leveraging of war weariness public into peace negotiations can the confederacy hope to win. but this was by no means a far fetched up. in the fall of 1862 dissension over president abraham lincoln's emancipation proclamation had cost unhappy voters in new york and new jersey to install democratic governors they're come a new round of anti-war democratic candidates to were due to run in the fall of 1863 governors' elections in ohio and pennsylvania. if those states also turned against the war they could force of abraham lincoln either to begin peace talks or
. >> weather, evidence of how fast rain can make big problems. this happened on sunday in gulfport, mississippi. storm hit during a church service. the rain fell so much worshippers became stranded in the church. 6 inches of rain falling in two hours there. the bishop says the property has drainage problems. only time the flooding was worse was during hurricane katrina. whoa. likely to be more flooding there today. there will also be heavy rain across the southeast into the mid-atlantic states. clear in the northeast across the midwest and plains. showers in the southwest and rockies. >> 97 degrees in denver. colorado springs. warming up in new york. haven't seen 86 here in weeks. 76, seattle. 90 minneapolis. miami. 109 degrees of dry, pizza oven heat in phoenix. >> the pet population at the white house is increasing by one. the first family has welcomed a second dog. her name is sunny, a portuguese water dog. >> same breed as bo, the obama's first dog. the white house says -- the breed works well for the obamas because of family allergies. sunny is entirely black, bo has a couple white spots d
, they essentially came the storm troopers of the movement. able to the mississippi delta were other organizations were afraid to go. certainly her. fannie lou hamer after the mississippi delta, sharecropping family, ma who, by her own account, by report went to school only one day, created, in her entire life. i would are used by one of the most eloquent spokespersons for the aims of the movement. a speech that she gave at the democratic national convention in 1964, you can you do it. if you have not heard it, here it. because it is the most eloquent statement that i have heard, courageous woman and is deathly her paper think if we move from a national level to the local level, the list grows and grows. one of, i was the one of the most exciting things about being sort of doing this history, being involved in a scholarly production of literacy about the civil rights movement is about a lot of really good stuff that is coming out that's talked about his local activists, were anonymous for the most part but without them he would not affect a national movement. and i think it was to go back to the p
thomas, the mother of three from mississippi at the new orleans saints training camp as a referee. >> and she is a member of the league's referee training program in line for an official full-time job. "gma" anchor josh elliott has her story. >> here we go. >> reporter: in the bold black and white stripes and hair tucked under that plaque hat, the official looks exactly like every other one on the field. >> watch your step here, 17. little tight. little tight. >> reporter: 39-year-old sarah thomas, married mother of three is on the verge of history. >> are you a tomboy? >> i am a tomboy, yes. but i am married with two boys. >> reporter: poised to become the first ever full time female official for the national football league. >> where's mama? >> 72, you've got to move up on those pass plays. put your guard up. put your guard up. individually, i am a female. a lot of things set us apart. race, gender, different background. but collectively, we're out there for the same goal. >> reporter: for 15 years, on fir -- officiating grade school, high school, and college games. discovered b
in madison, mississippi, thank you for holding on. you're on booktv on c-span2 with melanie phillips. >> caller: thank you for taking my call. ms. phillips, i've enjoyed you today. and as i was listening to you, um, i kept thinking of hypocrisy, abuse, double standards -- some of of which you talked about. some of the standards that you, um, are talking about today are great indeed, but certainly everybody wasn't given an opportunity to live by those standards. your, the caller before talked about how do we return to those standards, and i think the right needs to start by cleaning up their own house. if you have double standards, hypocrisy and abuse of power, people are going to reject those notions outright in anybody who espouses those beliefs. so until the right can clean up their own house and make sure that -- and while they have righteous indignation, let it be across the board. you know, i can hear you if your righteous indignation is only for those things that affect what's in your best interests and not in my best interests. so i wondered if you could comment on that. >> ho
already hard hit areas. gulfport, mississippi, slammed with more than a foot of rain leaving a church parking lot flooded out following sunday services. >>> olympic sprinter oscar pistorius charged with preita premeditated death. he was indicted on what would have been reeva steenkamp's 30th birthday. his trial scheduled to begin next year. >>> hosni mubarak has been acquitted in one case against him and remains in custody facing his most serious charge related to the deadly crackdown this spring. putting the u.s. and europe in the difficult position of reevaluating aid. >>> army private bradley manning could learn today just how much time he will spend in prison for leaking hundreds of thousands of classified documents to wikileaks. faces a maximum sentence of 90 years and manning apologized for his actions and for hurting the united states. a military judge could announce her decision as early as today. >>> critics of bob filner hitting the streets of san diego to collect 101 signatures. trying to recall their embattled mayor. 16 women now accuse filner of sexual harassment. later t
to parts of the gulf coast this weekend. gulf port mississippi is swamped. and flooding caused schools to be canceled today in three florida counties. more rain is in the forecast. >> >>> good morning. got a few clouds around the bay area this morning. so far it is quiet. this afternoon could get interesting. possibility of isolated thunderstorms around the bay area. looking back towards san francisco a little hazy and dense fog. low pressure spinning off the coastline. it is going to sit there the next few days and keep things unsettled through wednesday. red flag warnings up in the mountain tops. up into the 90s. >>> that national report sponsored by the new thriller in theaters august 28th. >>> new questions this morning about the death of princess diana. >> reporter: good morning, charlie, gayle. there have been conspiracy theories about the death of princess diana and dodi fayed in that paris car crash since it happened. police here in scotland yard are admitting they are actually looking into the latest allegation that the death was caused by, wait for it a member of
southern strategy, of ronald reagan's infamous trip to philadelphia, mississippi, now to the dismantling of the voting rights act and restricting voting laws we're seeing. is it disappointing that republicans weren't part of the march on washington anniversary? of course it was. but is it a surprise? not really. it's the story of the last 50 years. real football fans love a good snowball. if you are the governor of the state hosting the first outdoor cold weather super bowl ever, are you really supposed to say that's what you are hoping for? we'll tackle that next. we believe it can be the most valuable real estate on earth. ♪ that's why we designed the subaru forester from the back seat forward. the intelligently designed, responsibly built, completely restyled subaru forester. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. and this park is the inside of your body. you see the special psyllium fiber in metamucil actually gels to trap and remove some waste. and that gelling also helps to lower some cholesterol. it even traps some carbs to help maintain healthy blood sugar levels as part of
from katrina: how my mississippi hometown lost it all what mattered." i want to ask a brief question. how do you get cities to be willing to invest in resilience in the tough times in something that might happen. preparing for the possible when they are dealing with so many presses issues right now, again, the economy, crime,th. >> thank you. i would like jane first to lead off about a project might be working on. >> david mentioned that i'm working on a project, i have been because we have been so blessed in joplin and certainly not become experts by any mean. i think we have a set of practical experience. i've collected so far about 40 essays from people across all sector of joplin who are vod -- involved in recovery from the hospital chief to the city manager to the superintendent of schools about what we learn in the first year we think are lessons can pass on what we wish wed had known. the more i publicly state my goal the more it has to happen. i'm hoping i'll be done with it by the end of september and able to give it out to anyone in a way that is interested in a community o
, and it is a great honor. somebody who started out their r adult years as a reporter in jackson, mississippi, this is a great humbling honor. i am pleased to be here with people who have helped make me who i am and supported me in this work. bond, whoah, julian has been one of my hero since i was a small child. [applause] julian's wife pam horwitz amid the great members of the naacp staff come including -- is leading the charge on our work to secure voting rights across this country. iriethankful to jeff and for extending this welcome to the press club. to the press club staff and ms. cook. ever clearerecomes that the media continues to play and inform our conversation about race and being that the conscience of our country. we are grateful to "the new york and the role it played in helping stop and frisk in new york city. today i want to thank the man who is been my cocaptain of the national staff for the last five years, roger. chief operating officer, and last year you might recall there were a lot of questions. indeed, throughout 2011 and 2012, or questions, we would like folks turn out
of frank sinatra. ms. cel-- mississippi kelley's most recent book, "capturing camelot." very well photographed, obviously, and very well put together. personally, these picture books mean a lot more to me when the captions are well researched and thought out and a bit more prose than you would normally find which is what ms. kelley did with this book. never failing to raise a few eyebrows while uncovering stories and doing such a wonderfully painful job of reminding us our heroes are very, very human, please welcome to the festival kitty kelley. [applause] >> the only part of that introduction that isn't quite right is the prolific. it takes me four years -- >> i heard it from someone. >> no, you've got to be careful. [laughter] prolific as a turtle. it takes me four years usually on each book. but this one, this book was a labor of love because stanley tretick was one of my very best friends, and he was one of president kennedy's favorite photographers. and i used to go visit stanley in washington. and one time i asked him what he had in the marine corps locker that he used as hi
above mississippi. >>> and apple co-founder steve wozniak offering his review of "jobs" with ashton kutchers ahis former partner. steve likes ashton better in "that '70s show" let's just say. >>> futures lower after the longest losing streak since december for stocks. the dow down for four consecutive trading days losing 440 points. >>> the irs sent out letters to 20,000 small business owners over the past year notifying them of possible income underreporting. the irs thinks businesses that get most of their sales through credit cards may be underreporting their cash transactions. cnn money has a list of places where homes are the most affordable and your income goes the farthest. top, altemon springs, florida. >> we norman hat tan. we had red flag warnings in the area, talking about strong winds and dry lightning, eventually we'll get more moisture and see rain hit the ground and that will bring relief toward the second half of the week but it will take some time. >>> rain, way too much of it, in the southeast, one to two inches of rain still possible, three to four inches possible
euphemism mississippi appendectomy to give voice to the experience of poor black women in the south who were sterilized against their knowledge, an issue that has been in the news in the last couple of of weeks in hell of vonya and lastly i want to offer for you the black and the party was a health social movements. the black panther movement is a rorschach test for how we think about blacks politics in the last 20th century in particular but what we don't appreciate so much is that they were deeply engage and involved in issues of health activism health equality and access to medical care services in the united states. in particular as i discussed in my book they were engaged in getting people information to access to services that were under mentioned that we didn't know enough about, that the services were underutilized or not provided enough for such as sickle cell amenia -- a mania -- sickle cell anemia. harry its prior look that many of you probably know medical apartheid the black panther party was engaged in protecting black minis from overexposure to the bad forces of medical experi
a barge down the mississippi, tanker cars, or trucks. >> there's a story that was first report bid the hill newspaper saying that the e he on would likely be uld -- >> that's actedly not a new storyifment that came out a couple years ago and was investigated. and my understanding is there were no conflicts found. what you're starting to see is a recycling of a lot of events. keep in mind that executive order that was put in place that governs this entire process was put in place to expedite cross-border transportation facilities. instead of expediting it, this is now taking longer again, we could have built the empire state building five times by now, we completed world war ii in less time. so at some point you start to say, we've had four studies. we've had this, we've had that. at some point the question is has this policy really been high jacked or are we still on path? > eric from our democrat's line. >> we have environmental studies. we've also had practical xperience with spills. i don't know where o you're getting your safety record from, the 99.999%. if one of these pipelin
't mississippi and it wasn't alabama and you can see that even today, certainly there were racial and ethnic tensions but they were not so universal that interracial cooperation was rendered impossible. >> the belief is fading that answers can be found and we're losing the will to search for it. >> reporter: the war effort ended, the car business slowed. factories left for the suburbs and other states. sprawling neighborhoods began to empty. it was to the long before the hundreds of to you sands of people who transformed this city were suddenly nowhere to be found. >> so where do we go from here? how did we get here? we're going to look at that but also as we were driving in yesterday, noticed all the blithed buildings, so much work to be done in this city, but also so many positive things happening and so many beautiful aspects of this city's legacy that we're going to be talking about this morning straight ahead. >> mike, this has been happening slowly. you know, you can see it when you came here in the '70s. remember 1980 i think it was, they had the super bowl here. my god, that was 30 s
told me the problem is katrina, dpus starve, rita, ike, the mississippi oil spill. recently tropical storm isaac last year. so some of the operation concerns that we have. if you said how will which evacuate half of our coastline in a 38-hour period i know who to go to. i know how long it will take. how many hospitals you have in your, in your resbek tiff communities, in your state. how many of you expect will be evacuated or not. how many can help themselves. how many will need the state's assistance. how many of those will need federal assistance, i can tell you. today i just, even last night i was talking to some of my colleagues here too, all of sudden i find myself not, coming up with many so words or anxious about what i was saying to you, as policymakers. and i find that, we are asking for your help to add advocate for dollars to be to be returned because of things that i know, in terms of operations. you know i can tell just from american red cross has a 23 square foot per person, when we come up with capacity numbers, for a building. that is slowly been increasing as recomme
california or new york but louisiana, mississippi. >> that is the important point the interesting immigration graphic you would hear from the experts later but traditionally immigrants have shunned the south of man has been a problem that now use the dixie's like north carolina wednesday with the biggest percentage increase is georgia. that has become the high-growth state to the point where people ask our immigrants more attracted to a state with high welfare benefits or to the state that has jobs? what we have found is on balance democrats are more likely to go to low unemployment rates than with high welfare benefits which is the important timing because people are coming here because they want a job the. >> and it does make sense if you leave your country. >> it does make sense but there is so many people on the other side of this issue that the immigrants come here for welfare. some do but the vast majority do not. >> a very important point. >> so now with the international experts the author of a chapter of the bush institutes solutions looking at growth and immigration and evidence she
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)